(650) 342-7432

100 S. Ellsworth Ave.
Suite 507
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650) 342-7432

Post 1

Small bowel enteroscopy is safe and associated with very low risk. One possible complication is perforation, or tear through the wall of the bowel that may allow leakage of intestinal fluids. This complication usually requires surgery for treatment. Bleeding may occur from the site of biopsy or polyp removal. It is usually minor and stops on its own or can be controlled by cauterization (application of an electrical current) through the endoscope. Rarely transfusions or surgery are required. Irritation of a vein at the site where medications were administered may also occur. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask the doctor, GI nurse, or the technician.


Post 2

The development of more than 75-90 percent of colorectal cancer can be avoided through early detection and removal of these pre-cancerous polyps. The digestive health specialists from the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) urge you to get screened for colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is most common after age 50, but it can strike at younger ages. The chance of colon cancer increases with age. It's suggested that screenings begin at age 50 for men and women at average risk for colorectal cancer. African-Americans should begin colorectal cancer screening as early as age 45. African-Americans are diagnosed with colorectal cancer at a younger average age than whites, and African-Americans with colorectal cancer have a decreased survival rate compared with whites. Quick Clicks Cancer and nutrition: What you need to know Colonoscopy is considered the best test for colorectal cancer screening and prevention because it allows physicians to look directly at the entire colon and identify suspicious growths. It is the only test that can detect and remove pre-cancerous polyps from the colon during the same examination. For average-risk individuals, the ACG recommends colonoscopy screening every 10 years beginning at age 50 as the preferred strategy. Alternative strategies for average risk individuals include annual stool tests to detect blood and flexible sigmoidoscopic exams every five years, although unlike colonoscopy this approach does not allow visualization and removal of polyps in the entire colon. The ACG urges you to talk to your doctor about what screening tests are right for you. There is no reason for someone to die from a preventable cancer. With improved use of colon cancer screening, we can save lives.

 


Post 3

Did you know? The more red meat you eat, the higher your risk of colorectal cancer. That’s because it’s often high in saturated fat, which is tied to cancer of the small intestine, according to a 2008 Cancer Research study.


Post 4

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100 S. Ellsworth Ave
Suite 507
San Mateo CA, 94401