(650) 342-7432

100 S. Ellsworth Ave.
Suite 507
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650) 342-7432

October 12, 2017
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14th Annual Walk, Run & Ride

October 15th @ Lake Merced

 

IS IT A BIRD, IS IT A PLANE, NO IT'S A REGISTRATION!

 Cowabunga!

REGISTER, CREATE A TEAM, JOIN A TEAM, DONATE TO A TEAM AND BECOME AN IMPORTANT MEMBER OF OUR LOCAL EFFORTS TO POSITIVELY IMPACT THE LIVES OF OUR COMMUNITY.     

The largest team wins $1,000.00 donated by an anonymous donor.

Raffle, food, prizes, t-shirt, superhero medal and good feelings available!

Register online @ http://www.stridesforlife.org or email [email protected] 

(650) 692-3700

Colorectal cancer deaths among white patients under age 55 have increased, according to a research letter in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The reason is unknown.

Click here to read more.

MedPage Today

Tier one options are considered the “cornerstones of screening” and include colonoscopy every 10 years. The task force, which includes the American College of Gastroenterology, called for black Americans to begin CRC screening at age 45 and acknowledged the trend of higher rates of CRC in adults younger than age 50 is a "major public health concern."

Healio (free registration)

Researchers have developed a risk-prediction model that estimates colorectal cancer survival, for up to 10 years post-diagnosis, according to a report in The BMJ. Factors associated with better survival in women included younger age, earlier cancer stage, well or moderately differentiated cancer, surgery, family history of bowel cancer, and being prescribed statins and aspirin at diagnosis. Results were similar for men.

Medscape (free registration)/Reuters

San Mateo County has moved to California's top spot in the 2017 County Health Rankings from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The http://www.countyhealthrankings.org report, which measures the current overall health of nearly every county in all 50 states, aims to help counties understand what influences the health of their residents and how long they will live. The 57 counties in California were ranked in specific categories as well. San Mateo ranked:

  • 1 in Health Outcomes
  • 5 in Quality of Life
  • 2 in Health Factors
  • 5 in Clinical Care
  • 1 in Social & Economic Factors
  • 29 in Physical Environment

USA Today (2/28, Painter),  AP (2/28, Neergaard), the Washington Post (2/28, A1, McGinley), and the New York Times (2/28, Rabin, Subscription Publication) report that research published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates “colon and rectal cancers have increased dramatically and steadily in millennials and Generation X adults in the United States over the past four decades.”  Rebecca Siegel, who led the study, “suggested one explanation might be a complex interaction involving the same factors that have contributed to the obesity epidemic — changes in diet, a sedentary lifestyle, excess weight and low fiber consumption.”  Young people with colorectal cancer may be diagnosed later in the course of their disease.

March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month. Take the test to estimate your risk of colorectal cancer...and get screened!

https://www.ccalliance.org/get-screened/prevention-and-screening/risk-quiz/

Did you know? The more red meat you eat, the higher your risk of colorectal cancer. That’s because it’s often high in saturated fat, which is tied to cancer of the small intestine, according to a 2008 Cancer Research study.

December 01, 2016
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The development of more than 75-90 percent of colorectal cancer can be avoided through early detection and removal of these pre-cancerous polyps. The digestive health specialists from the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) urge you to get screened for colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is most common after age 50, but it can strike at younger ages. The chance of colon cancer increases with age. It's suggested that screenings begin at age 50 for men and women at average risk for colorectal cancer. African-Americans should begin colorectal cancer screening as early as age 45. African-Americans are diagnosed with colorectal cancer at a younger average age than whites, and African-Americans with colorectal cancer have a decreased survival rate compared with whites. Quick Clicks Cancer and nutrition: What you need to know Colonoscopy is considered the best test for colorectal cancer screening and prevention because it allows physicians to look directly at the entire colon and identify suspicious growths. It is the only test that can detect and remove pre-cancerous polyps from the colon during the same examination. For average-risk individuals, the ACG recommends colonoscopy screening every 10 years beginning at age 50 as the preferred strategy. Alternative strategies for average risk individuals include annual stool tests to detect blood and flexible sigmoidoscopic exams every five years, although unlike colonoscopy this approach does not allow visualization and removal of polyps in the entire colon. The ACG urges you to talk to your doctor about what screening tests are right for you. There is no reason for someone to die from a preventable cancer. With improved use of colon cancer screening, we can save lives.

December 01, 2016
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Small bowel enteroscopy is safe and associated with very low risk. One possible complication is perforation, or tear through the wall of the bowel that may allow leakage of intestinal fluids. This complication usually requires surgery for treatment. Bleeding may occur from the site of biopsy or polyp removal. It is usually minor and stops on its own or can be controlled by cauterization (application of an electrical current) through the endoscope. Rarely transfusions or surgery are required. Irritation of a vein at the site where medications were administered may also occur.

If you have any questions, please feel free to ask the doctor, GI nurse, or the technician.

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Consultants
November 28, 2016
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Colorectal cancer is increasing in young adults

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/857294

Coffee, tea, and carbonated beverages not only over-relax the esophageal sphincter, which keeps stomach acid confined to the stomach, but they also can act as diuretics, which can lead to diarrhea and cramping. Caffeinated beverages can be a particular problem, especially for people with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). If you have GERD or heartburn, you should avoid mint tea; it can, however, also calm the stomach.

 

Vitamins A, C, D, and B vitamins are all essential to digestive health. Read on to learn which vitamins are the most important for healthy digestion and how to incorporate them into your eating habits.

  • B vitamins are found in proteins such as fish, poultry, meat, and dairy products, as well as leafy greens and beans, and help your body form red blood cells and get energy from the food you eat, the NIH explains.
  • C vitamins is an antioxidant, many people associate vitamin C with the immune system and preventing colds, but this essential vitamin also aids in digestion by supporting healthy teeth and gums and helping the body absorb iron, according to the NIH.
  • Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium and plays a key role in how your nerves, muscles, and immune system function, according to the NIH. What’s more, healthy levels of vitamin D are associated with a reduced risk for colon cancer, according to a 2015 study published in Gut.
  • Vitamin A is involved primarily in boosting vision, bone, and reproductive health, as well as helping the immune system, according to the NIH. Colorful fruits and vegetables, such as sweet potatoes, carrots, kale, and other dark greens, as well as liver and milk are rich sources of vitamin A.

HALO ablation eliminates Barrett’s tissue in 98.4 percent of patients, allowing new, healthy esophageal tissue to grow in three to four weeks. Most patients recover quickly with minimal side effects, such as a sore throat. Because HALO ablation is a minimally invasive procedure, no incisions are required and it can be completed in an outpatient setting in around 30 minutes. In addition, the HALO system has a lower rate of complications than other forms of ablation therapy.

August 29, 2016
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Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) occurs when the stomach contents including acid move back up into the oesophagus. Patients usually describe their symptoms as heartburn or indigestion. Sufferers often report increased reflux after large fatty or spicy meals, particularly when eaten close to bedtime. GOR is more common in overweight individuals, but those of an acceptable weight can also suffer. Chronic reflux can result in oesophagitis (inflamed oesophagus), further increasing sensitivity to acid and foods. So today we are sharing a healthy eating guide for reflux:

  • Breakfast - a bowl of high fibre cereal such as untoasted muesli, weetbix or porridge with fresh or tinned fruit and reduced fat or skim milk and/ or wholemeal or grain toast with minimal margarine and honey or vegemite. Tea.
  • Lunch - sandwiches made with wholemeal bread with low fat cheeses, lean meats, tinned fish and salad. Skip the margarine. Tinned or fresh fruit with low fat yoghurt. Water, tea or diluted juice.
  • Main Meal - chicken and vegetable stir fry with minimal oil. Served with steamed rice. Iced water with a squeeze of lemon or lime juice.

August 29, 2016
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Did you know?!? We eat about 500kg of food per year.

August 29, 2016
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After Ulcerative Colitis surgery watch for complications. If you have any of  these symptoms, seek immediate medical treatment:

  • Infection or pouch inflammation or Pouchitis. Signs: Diarrhea, stool frequency, crampy stomach pain, fever, joint pain. Treatment: Antibiotics.
  • Blockage or bowel obstruction. Signs: Cramping, nausea, vomiting. Treatment: IV fluids and fasting, sometimes surgery.
  • Pouch failure. Signs: Fever, swelling, pain. Treatment: Surgery and permanent ileostomy.

August 15, 2016
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No matter how well you plan, accidents may happen. Be prepared by keeping emergency supplies on hand at home, work or school, and on the road. Discrete, portable packaging is available for many products. Here are some products to try:

  • Fast-acting medication (for gas, bloating, or diarrhea)
  • Pre-moistened travel wipes
  • An extra pair of underwear
  • Disposable pads or underwear for incontinence
  • Plastic bags to dispose of soiled wipes and clothes

Stash these supplies in your purse, car, suitcase, and your desk at work, then put your mind at ease. If accidents, fecal incontinence persists, talk to your doctor.

August 15, 2016
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A colorectal "polyp" is a small finger-like or flat lump growing from the lining of the colon. There are many types of polyps, some of which are rare. The two most common types are adenomas and hyperplastic polyps.

The most important colorectal polyp is the adenoma, a small benign tumour growing to about 2 cm in size. Colonic adenomas are common, occurring in more than 20% of the population, and in the majority of patients there is no ill effect on health. They are more common with increasing age. There is good evidence that colonic adenomas are the early stage of colorectal cancer, although only a very small percentage of adenomas undergo malignant change and this process is very slow (e.g. five to 15 years).

Most patients with colonic polyps have no symptoms, and often polyps are detected at the time of investigation for unrelated symptoms. Where symptoms occur these are usually bleeding and sometimes pass mucous (especially large villous adenomas). Colonic polyps usually do not cause abdominal pain, diarrhoea, or constipation.

August 15, 2016
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Enzymes called proteases break down proteins within the stomach and small intestine. While in saliva, amylases break down carbohydrates and lipases break down fats.

August 04, 2016
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Many people believe on the myth that colonoscopy will hurt! Actually, it shouldn't. Prior to the procedure, patients are given a combination of a narcotic and sedative called "conscious sedation." About 95 percent of patients sleep through the entire procedure and wake up with no memory of the experience. About five percent of people experience cramping, and state that it felt similar to the urge to have a bowel movement.

If you are worried about discomfort, or have any fear related to the procedure, please tell your nurse or physician. They can help alleviate your fear and discuss options with you. Additionally, if you are uncomfortable being sedated, or have side effects related to sedation, your physician can perform the procedure without sedation. However, it is less stressful and more comfortable for the vast majority of patients to utilize conscious sedation for a colonoscopy.

If fear is keeping you from scheduling your colonoscopy, consider a virtual colonoscopy. The prep procedure is the same, but a virtual colonoscopy is done in an external CT scanner instead of with an internal scope, and is done without sedation.

August 04, 2016
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Today we are going to share the Heartburn symptoms! Heartburn has several symptoms including:

  • A burning feeling in the chest just behind the breastbone that occurs after eating and lasts a few minutes to several hours
  • Chest pain, especially after bending over, lying down or eating
  • Burning in the throat, or hot, sour, acidic or salty-tasting fluid at the back of the throat
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Feeling of food "sticking" in the middle of the chest or throat

Reporting these symptoms to your doctor is usually all that is needed for your doctor to diagnose heartburn. However your doctor may perform special tests such as endoscopy or pH monitoring to determine the severity of your problem or to monitor your treatment.

August 04, 2016
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Did you know, bananas are good food for digestive health? Bananas help restore normal bowel function, especially if you have diarrhea. And they restore electrolytes and potassium that may be lost due to runny stool. This fruit also has lots of fiber to aid digestion.

By Lee Eugene MD
July 28, 2016
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Nutrition plays a big role in many digestive disorders because what you eat has an important effect on your gastrointestinal (GI) tract. If your GI tract is abnormal in any way your doctor will suggest specific dietary changes to help alleviate some of your symptoms. Some of this dietary changes may help correct and prevent the problem. For example: increasing the amount of fibre in your diet and drinking more water will help prevent constipation; and excluding gluten, a specific type of protein, may be required for the rest of your life if you have coeliac disease. Although this may sound difficult, it could save your life and you will be grateful to be able to enjoy your meals again without suffering from painful symptoms afterwards. Your doctor may advise you to change your lifestyle. For example, if you have reflux disease you should avoid lying down after eating; and if you have a peptic ulcer you may need to limit foods and drinks containing caffeine.

Making the appropriate changes to manage your digestive disorders requires patience and a trial and error period. You may find it helps to write down the offending foods that give you wind or cause you to feel bloated. If this continues to happen over and over again, then eliminating these foods may be beneficial to you. But remember, if you eliminate food groups from your diet you may need to take supplements. For example, those who avoid dairy products will need calcium supplements to prevent osteoporosis from developing. A lot has changed over the years with regards to nutrition for digestive disorders.

 

By Lee Eugene MD
July 28, 2016
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Being stressed can cause a lot of problems with digestion, so if you’re going through some big life event, not getting enough sleep or exercise, or you’re just generally anxious, work on that and see if it helps your gut. You know the ways: therapy, taking more time for yourself, yoga, meditation, sex, painting, whatever works for you. I know someone who had diarrhea for literally a year straight and when she broke up with her boyfriend and moved out of her house, it went away. Guess it was a stressful relationship…

 
By Lee Eugene MD
July 28, 2016
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Many patients ask us about Flexible Sigmoidoscopy procedure and what should they expect during Flexible Sigmoidoscopy? In order to ensure a safe and thorough procedure, you will need to follow a clear liquid diet and have an enema prior to the procedure. This way your digestive tract is clear and your doctor has good visibility. Your doctor will give you specific instructions on how to prepare, including which prescription medications are safe to take.
 
During a flexible sigmoidoscopy, you remain awake and lie on your left side. Usually, no sedative is necessary. Your doctor will:
  1.  Insert the lubricated sigmoidoscope through the rectum and into the anus and large intestine.
  2. Introduce some air into your colon to improve visibility; you may experience some cramping or pressure when this happens.
  3. Examine the images on a nearby monitor.
  4. Possibly insert biopsy forceps through the scope in order to remove a small sample of tissue for further analysis.
 

Cutting out gluten from your diet may seem like a difficult and limiting task. Fortunately, there are many healthy and delicious foods that are naturally gluten-free! In fact, the most cost-effective and healthy way to follow the gluten-free diet is to seek out these naturally gluten-free food groups, which include:

  • Fruits
  • Vegetables
  • Meat and poultry
  • Fish and seafood
  • Dairy
  • Beans, legumes, and nuts

It is important to include a wide variety of gluten free products in a diet. Gluten Free Diet is good for Coeliac Disease.

July 14, 2016
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The small intestine is the longest section of the digestive tract, with an average length of about 6 metres. Although only 2.5 cm in diameter - which is why it is called the small intestine - its surface area for absorption covers the size of a tennis court. This is due to the numerous folds on its surface, covered in tiny projections known as villi, which in turn are covered in even tinier projections known as microvilli.

Large quantities of nutrients and water can be absorbed in the small intestine. Daily, it is capable of absorbing: several kilograms of carbohydrate; up to 1 kg of fat; 500gms protein; and 20 litres of water.

The surface cells of the small intestine are highly specialised for digestion and absorption of nutrients. Almost all the body's nutrient absorption occurs in the small intestine, along its three sub-divisions: the duodenum Þ jejunum Þ ileum. Sites for absorption of specific nutrients (eg: iron, vitamin.B12) are located in these divisions, but most absorption occurs in the jejunum (middle section). The specialised cells contain digestive enzymes, carrier proteins and other secretions. Blood vessels transport nutrients away from the intestine to the liver in the first instance.

July 14, 2016
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Colonoscopy and polypectomy are very safe. Serious complications are rare. These include:

  • Reaction or sensitivity to medication used for sedation (this may affect your breathing briefly)
  • Perforation (puncture) of the lining of the bowel (about 1 patient in 2000-5000)
  • Bleeding - if blood vessels are injected or a polyp is removed (about 1 patient in 300-500)
  • Infection of the bowel, blood, and other organs
  • Heart attacks, cardiac arrest, blood clots, and breathing problems (very rare)
  • There are other very rare complications - please advise if you wish to be given more details

Everything will be done to minimise the risk of these complications. There are ways of detecting these complications early and specific treatments are available if they do arise. Very rarely there may be a need for hospitalisation, major surgery, intravenous feeding, or blood transfusion. Although death can result from complications of colonoscopy this is very rare.

This year's Strides For Life Run/Walk will be held annual run/walk on October 23rd at Lake Merced.

June 22, 2016
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Eating right can help prevent digestive problems or soothe your system when problems flare up. Follow your doctor’s instructions on what to eat and what to avoid. Pay attention to portion sizes, as well as how often and how quickly you eat.

What to eat depends partly on the specific cause of your digestive problems as well as what foods you’re sensitive to. Here are some general guidelines to keep in mind:

  1. Gradually add more fiber to your diet. Fiber-rich foods add bulk to your stools, which helps regulate your digestion. Increase your fiber intake gradually to prevent bloating, gas, and diarrhea.
  2. Eat several small meals throughout the day to prevent the sudden bowel contractions that large meals can cause.

June 22, 2016
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Did you know? Every day 11.5 liters of digested food, liquids and digestive juices flow through the digestive system, but only 100 mls is lost in feces.

A diagnosis of Barrett’s esophagus requires that the patient undergo an upper endoscopy procedure by their physician, typically a gastroenterologist or surgical endoscopist. Endoscopy is a non-surgical procedure and is performed using conscious sedation. Barrett’s esophagus tissue appears as a different color on examination, which directs a biopsy of the tissue for pathology evaluation. A finding of intestinal cells in the esophagus (intestinal metaplasia) confirms a Barrett’s esophagus diagnosis.

Most commonly, Barrett's esophagus is diagnosed during an upper endoscopy procedure, or also known as esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). The endoscopy procedure consists of a thin, flexible tube that is guided down the throat. The tube, known as an endoscope, has a video lens and light at its tip that transmits images to a video monitor nearby. This allows the doctor to visually inspect and capture images of the tissue of the esophagus.

There are new thin endoscopes that allow the physician to pass an endoscope through the patient's nose to quickly and conveniently check the patient for Barrett's esophagus. There are also new small capsules with built-in cameras that the patient may swallow and have a physician screen them for Barrett's esophagus.

Fat

June 07, 2016
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Beyond keeping us from fitting into our favorite jeans, fatty and fried foods are hard to digest, slow the process way down, and tax a system that would otherwise run well. Looking for ways to cut back? Try choosing meats that are lower in fat such as chicken and turkey and go for lean cuts of pork. Switch from whole or reduced-fat dairy to low-fat or non-fat, and replace butter and margarine with olive oil.

About 1 percent of the U.S. population has celiac disease, an autoimmune and digestive disorder. Sufferers are unable to eat gluten—a protein found in rye, barley, wheat, and more—without triggering an attack on their small intestine. Symptoms vary from person to person, but include: abdominal pain and bloating; chronic diarrhea; vomiting; constipation; and pale, foul-smelling, or fatty stool. Doctors typically diagnose it with blood tests and stool samples.

While there's no cure, people can manage celiac disease by adopting a gluten-free diet. Within several weeks, inflammation in the small intestine will subside—though accidently eating a product with gluten could cause a flare-up at any time.

  1. The ‘Prep’ Is Horrible: Firstly, the purpose of a colonoscopy ‘prep’ is to cleanse the colon of all fecal matter so that at the time of the colonoscopy your colon is as clean as possible so that the smallest of polyps can be identified and removed. The stories of the horrible ‘prep’ stem mainly from the days when we would prescribe a gallon of cleansing ‘prep’ solution. Those days are gone, or at least they should be.
  2. The Colonoscopy Will Hurt: Colonoscopy should not hurt. OK, the only thing that might hurt is the intravenous needle that is inserted into your arm. Colonoscopy is typically performed with either of two types of intravenous sedative medications: conscious sedation or propofol.
  3. I Won't Be Able To Handle Not Eating For 24-Hours: I am surprised at the number of patients who actually don’t complain about being starved at the time of the colonoscopy. To be fair, some patients complain about being hungry and most can’t wait until that next meal.
  4. A Colonoscopy Is Embarrassing: Gastroenterologists and the endoscopy center staff understand that a colonoscopy is a potentially embarrassing experience for patients. The entire staff makes the experience as ‘un-embarrassing’ as possible.
  5. There Could Be Complications: The risks associated with colonoscopy are very rare. They include sedation-related complications, bleeding, and perforation (poking a hole in the colon).

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc.
May 17, 2016
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After you check in, one of our nurses will meet with you to review your medical conditions and medications. An IV line will be placed in a vein in your arm. You will proceed to the procedure room, where your blood pressure, pulse and oxygen level will be carefully monitored. A sedative will also be administered through your IV, and you may need general anesthesia. The test itself usually takes about an hour to two hours. After the test, you will rest until the effects of the medicine wear off.

You will not be able to drive following the procedure, so plan on having someone with you to take you home. Before leaving, our staff will speak with you about the preliminary results of your test and will let you know when you can go back to eating your regular diet.


By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc.
May 17, 2016
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If you're experiencing severe symptoms from diverticulitis, your doctor may recommend a liquid diverticulitis diet as part of your treatment, which can include: Water, Fruit juices, Brothand Ice pops. Gradually you can ease back into a regular diet. Your doctor may advise you to start with low-fiber foods (white bread, meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products) before introducing high-fiber foods.

Fiber softens and adds bulk to stools, helping them pass more easily through the colon. It also reduces pressure in the digestive tract. Many studies show that eating fiber-rich foods can help control diverticular symptoms. Try to eat at least 25-35 grams of fiber a day. Here are a few fiber-rich foods to include in meals:

  • Whole-grain breads, pastas, and cereals
  • Beans (kidney beans and black beans, for example)
  • Fresh fruits (apples, pears, prunes)
  • Vegetables (squash, potatoes, peas, spinach)


May 13, 2016
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Berries are good for your health, but ones with tiny seeds can be a problem for people who have diverticulitis, or pockets that develop in the intestine (usually the large intestine) that become inflamed or infected.

The theory is that the seeds will obstruct the [pockets] and pose a risk of infection. It's never been proven in a study but it's always been theorized. If you find that seeds, including sunflower or pumpkin seeds, irritate your intestines, stay away from them.

Is your digestive tract irritable? Do you have stomach pain or discomfort at least three times a month for several months? It could be irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), another common digestive condition.

Ten to 15 percent of the U.S. population suffers from irritable bowel syndrome, according to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. Signs of IBS can vary widely: You can be constipated or have diarrhea, or have hard, dry stools on one day and loose watery stools on another. Bloating is also a symptom of IBS.

What causes IBS isn’t known, but treatment of symptoms centers largely on diet, such as avoiding common trigger foods (dairy products, alcohol, caffeine, artificial sweeteners and beans, cabbage, and other foods that produce gas), or following a low-fat diet that's also high in fiber.

Friendly bacteria, such as the probiotics found in live yogurt, may also help you feel better. Stress can trigger IBS symptoms, so some people find cognitive-behavioral therapy or low-dose antidepressants to be useful treatments, as well.

Your doctor will prepare you for the examination by applying a sensor device to your abdomen with adhesive sleeves (similar to tape). The pill-sized capsule endoscope is swallowed and passes naturally through your digestive tract while transmitting video images to a data recorder worn on your belt for approximately eight hours. At the end of the procedure you will return to the office and the data recorder is removed so that images of your small bowel can be put on a computer screen for physician review.

Most patients consider the test comfortable. The capsule endoscope is about the size of a large pill. After ingesting the capsule and until it is excreted you should not be near an MRI device or schedule an MRI examination.

April 08, 2016
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Once the electrodes of the balloon are positioned on the desired treatment area the balloon is inflated. The HALO360 Energy Generator and the ablation catheter then work together to deliver a short burst of energy that is circumferential: 360 degrees. Once the electrodes of the balloon are positioned on the desired treatment area the balloon is inflated. The HALO360 Energy Generator and the ablation catheter then work together to deliver a short burst of energy that is circumferential: 360 degrees.

1. The design of this technology limits the energy delivery to a depth clinically proven to remove the diseased tissue while reducing the risk of injury to the deeper and healthy tissue layers.

2. The HALO360+ Ablation Catheter ablates a 3cm circumferential segment of Barrett's tissue within the oesophagus

April 08, 2016
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Blood in the stool means there is bleeding somewhere in your digestive tract. Here's what you need to know about the possible causes of bloody stools and what you -- and your doctor -- should do if you discover a problem.

1. Diverticular disease. Diverticula are small pouches that project from the colon wall.

2. Anal fissure. A small cut or tear in the tissue lining the anus similar to the cracks that occur in chapped lips or a paper cut.

3. Colitis. Inflammation of the colon. Among the more common causes are infections or inflammatory bowel disease.

4. Angiodysplasia. A condition in which fragile, abnormal blood vessels lead to bleeding.

5. Peptic ulcers. An open sore in the lining of the stomach or duodenum, the upper end of the small intestine. 

6. Polyps or cancer. Polyps are benign growths that can grow, bleed, and become cancerous. Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the U.S.

April 08, 2016
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Probiotics are those “good bugs” you hear health nuts raving about. Our intestinal flora, in fact, is made up of trillions of good bacteria that aid in digestion and promote immunity and health.

The No. 1 probiotic food is yogurt. Yes, it’s a dairy product, but eating yogurt calms digestive complaints. That’s because it contains live cultures, typically lactobacillus and bifidobacterium, that help lactose digestion. When choosing a yogurt, make sure the cultures are listed as “live” or “active.” Yogurts with added fiber are even better. 

March 30, 2016
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Did you know? Food is cooled or warmed in the mouth until it is a good temperature for the body.

March 30, 2016
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About 1 percent of the U.S. population has celiac disease, an autoimmune and digestive disorder. Sufferers are unable to eat gluten—a protein found in rye, barley, wheat, and more—without triggering an attack on their small intestine. Symptoms vary from person to person, but include: abdominal pain and bloating; chronic diarrhea; vomiting; constipation; and pale, foul-smelling, or fatty stool. Doctors typically diagnose it with blood tests and stool samples.

While there's no cure, people can manage celiac disease by adopting a gluten-free diet. Within several weeks, inflammation in the small intestine will subside—though accidently eating a product with gluten could cause a flare-up at any time.

March 30, 2016
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Did you know? Upper endoscopy is more accurate than X-rays for detecting abnormal growths such as cancer and for examining the inside of the upper digestive system. In addition, abnormalities can be treated through the endoscope. For example:

1. Polyps (growths of tissue in the stomach) can be identified and removed, and tissue samples (biopsies) can be taken for analysis.
2. Narrowed areas or strictures of the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum from cancer or other diseases can be dilated or stretched using balloons or other devices. In some cases, a stent (a wire or plastic mesh tube) can be put in the stricture to prop it open.
3. Objects stuck in the esophagus can be removed.
4. Bleeding due to ulcers, cancer or varices can be treated.

 

What Happens After a Colonoscopy?

The patient will go home later the same day when having a colonoscopy, because it is done as an outpatient procedure (without checking into the hospital). But before going home, the patient will be observed for some time and monitored until the effects of the medications have resolved. The patient should make arrangements for someone to come to the clinic and take them home, because nausea, bloating, and drowsiness can continue for some time after the procedure. Recovery time after the procedure can vary. If there are no complications it can range from a few yours to a few days.

March 17, 2016
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Ulcerative colitis is another inflammatory bowel disease that affects about 700,000 Americans. The symptoms of ulcerative colitis are very similar to those of Crohn's, but the part of the digestive tract affected is solely the large intestine, also known as the colon.

If your immune system mistakes food or other materials for invaders, sores or ulcers develop in the colon’s lining. If you experience frequent and urgent bowel movements, pain with diarrhea, blood in your stool, or abdominal cramps, visit your doctor.

Medication can suppress the inflammation, and eliminating foods that cause discomfort may help as well. In severe cases, treatment for ulcerative colitis may involve surgery to remove the colon.

March 17, 2016
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Did you know?!?

Every day 11.5 liters of digested food, liquids and digestive juices flow through the digestive system, but only 100 mls is lost in feces.

Today we are going to discuss the advantages of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy!

Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy takes less time, carries less risk and costs less than a surgical gastrostomy which requires opening the abdomen. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is a commonly-performed so there are many physicians with experience in performing the procedure. When feasible, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy is preferable to a surgical gastrostomy.

 

Caffeine stimulates gastrointestinal tract motility, making contents move more quickly through your system, and excessive amounts can give anyone diarrhea. So if you already have diarrhea, caffeine will only worsen your digestive problem. Remember that tea, soda, and chocolate are other sources of caffeine, and should be put on hold until tummy troubles go away.

March 10, 2016
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Did you know?!?

Hydrochloric acid, produced by the stomach, can dissolve metal but has no effect on plastic.

The Bravo system is not for everyone. If you have bleeding diathesis, strictures, severe esophagitis, varices, obstructions, a pacemaker, or an implantable cardiac defibrillator, you should not have a Bravo pH test.

Additionally, because the capsule contains a small magnet, you should not undergo an MRI study within 30 days of having a Bravo pH test.

Talk to your doctor about your symptoms and testing options to see if a Bravo pH test for GERD is right for you.

Crohn’s most commonly affects the end of the small intestine called the ileum, but it can affect any part of the digestive tract. As many as 700,000 Americans may be affected by Crohn’s, according to the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America.

This chronic condition is an autoimmune disease, meaning that your immune system mistakenly attacks cells in your own body that it thinks are foreign invaders. The most common Crohn's symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhea, rectal bleeding, weight loss, and fever. “Treatment depends on the symptoms and can include topical pain relievers, immunosuppressants, and surgery”.

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month!
Do yourself a favor- get over the embarrassment and have that colonoscopy.
Colonoscopy reduces your chance of dying from colorectal cancer. A study
found that reductions were greater for screening colonoscopy than for
diagnostic colonoscopy, and results were similar for men and women. Read
<http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/hulUCvkeswovmouYfCwjiMcOaZWw> the abstract.
Healio (free registration)/Gastroenterology
<http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/hulUCvkeswovmovkfCwjiMcOkdlh?format=standard

And if you've had your colonoscopy already, then send someone you love a
screen-a-gram to get their "rear in gear."

http://screeningsaves.org/screen-a-gram/

February 24, 2016
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Dress in Blue Day is Friday March 4, 2016 – Colon Cancer Alliance

The Colon Cancer Alliance sponsors this day to raise awareness. Learn more about Dress in Blue Day at dressinblueday.org

February 16, 2016
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Today we are going to discuss How celiac disease is diagnosed? Celiac disease is suspected in people who have signs or symptoms of recurrent diarrhea, abdominal bloating, and malabsorption or malnutrition. Other diseases, however, can produce malabsorption and malnutrition, such as pancreatic insufficiency (a pancreas that is not able to produce digestive enzymes), Crohn's disease of the small intestine, and small intestinal overgrowth of bacteria. It is important, therefore, to confirm suspected celiac disease with appropriate testing.

February 16, 2016
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For good digestive health get insoluble and soluble fiber. It is important to consume both types of fiber, which each help your digestive system in different ways. Insoluble fiber, also known as roughage, can't be digested by the body and therefore helps add bulk to the stools. Soluble fiber draws in water and can help prevent stools that are too watery. Good sources of insoluble fiber include wheat bran, vegetables, and whole grains; get soluble fiber from oat bran, nuts, seeds, and legumes.

February 16, 2016
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To prepare for your capsule endoscopy, your doctor is likely to ask that you:

  1. Stop eating and drinking at least 12 hours before the procedure. This will ensure that the camera captures clear images of your digestive tract.
  2. Stop or delay taking certain medications. To keep medication from interfering with the camera, your doctor might ask you not to take certain medications before the procedure. In other cases, your doctor will want you to take your medication two hours before or after you swallow the camera capsule that contains the camera.
  3. Plan to take it easy for the day. In most cases, you'll be able to go about your day after you swallow the camera capsule. But you'll likely be asked not to do strenuous exercise or heavy lifting. If you have an active job, ask your doctor whether you can go back to work the day of your capsule endoscopy.

Studies assess effects of coffee, vitamin C on liver disease 

A study of Chinese patients found that vitamin C intake may help nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.  A second study found daily coffee consumption was linked to a lower risk of liver cirrhosis!  
Healio (free registration) (2/2)
Medical News Today (2/3)

February 05, 2016
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Many people love spicy food and it doesn't bother their digestive system. Others find their tummy is upset when they have spicy food. It's not just scorching hot foods like chillies that trigger heartburn. Milder but flavourful foods like garlic and onion can also bring it on.

If spicy foods give you heartburn, stomach pain or diarrhoea, go easy on them in future. If you already have a problem like heartburn or an irritable bowel, avoid them completely.

February 05, 2016
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Did you know?  Stomach rumblings (borborygmi) are caused by wave-like muscular contractions (peristalsis) at the walls of the stomach and small intestine. These are normal digestion movements, however the process is louder and more noticeable when the stomach is empty as the sound is not muffled.

Complications from gastrointestinal endoscopy are rare. There is a slight risk of puncturing your throat (esophagus), stomach, or upper small intestine (duodenum). If this happens, you may need to have surgery to fix it. There is also a slight chance of infection after an endoscopy.

Bleeding may also occur from the test or if a tissue sample (biopsy) is taken, but this usually stops on its own without treatment. If you vomit during the examination and some of the material you vomit enters your lungs, aspiration pneumonia is a possible risk. If it develops, it can be treated with antibiotics.

 

Screening finds CRC at earlier stages, study says

UK researchers found almost two-fifths of colorectal cancer cases discovered through patient screenings were at stage I, compared with less than a fifth after a physician referral and about one-sixteenth when patients went to a hospital emergency department. Long-term survival is much better for colorectal cancer diagnosed at stage I, compared with stage IV.

Medscape (free registration) (1/26)

February 02, 2016
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Study: 15% of colorectal cancers found in people under age 50 

A study found one in seven colorectal cancers in the U.S. from 1998 to 2011 were diagnosed in people younger than 50, and younger patients were more likely to have tumors that had spread to lymph nodes or other organs. Researchers said younger colorectal cancer patients whose tumors had metastasized were more likely than older patients to get aggressive treatments.

Reuters (1/25)

January 26, 2016
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Small pouches called diverticula can form anywhere there are weak spots in the lining of your digestive system, but they are most commonly found in the colon.

If you have diverticula but no symptoms, the condition is called diverticulosis, which is quite common among older adults and rarely causes problems; however, if the pouches bleed or become inflamed, it’s called diverticulitis. Symptoms include rectal bleeding, fever, and abdominal pain. Obesity is a major risk factor for diverticulitis.

Mild diverticulitis is treated with antibiotics and a liquid diet so your colon can heal. A low fiber diet could be the cause of diverticulitis, so your doctor may direct you to eat a diet high in fiber — whole grains, legumes, vegetables — as part of your treatment.

If you have severe attacks that recur frequently, you may need surgery to remove the diseased part of your colon.

January 26, 2016
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Did you know?  Once swallowed, bolus (food) travels down through the esophagus to the stomach, taking about 7 seconds to get there.

January 26, 2016
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There are so many patients out there who ask me What they can expect during flexible sigmoidoscopy? Flexible sigmoidoscopy is generally well tolerated and rarely causes any significant pain. There may be a sensation of fullness, bloating, pressure, or cramping during the procedure. In most instances, you will be lying on your left side while the instrument is advanced through the rectum and the colon under direct vision on a TV monitor. As the instrument is withdrawn, a careful examination is made by the lining of the colon. The procedure usually takes only 5 to 15 minutes.

January 25, 2016
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Do you really need to treat your hemorrhoids? The answer is yes. Left untreated, hemorrhoids often get worse over time – and therefore harder to treat. This means that a hemorrhoid that could easily be banded today could eventually require surgery. If you’re wondering whether to pursue treatment or leave your body to heal naturally, the reality is that you should immediately pursue treatment. Here are 3 Reasons You Should Not Wait to Pursue Treatment:

  1. It will take a long time for your body to heal itself naturally.
  2. It will hurt immensely.  
  3. You may get other infections.

In addition, some people experience hemorrhoid-like symptoms when they actually have a more serious underlying gastrointestinal condition.

If you have experienced reoccurring bouts with hemorrhoids, you may consult with Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists, Inc. Immediately.

January 25, 2016
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Did you know? Some animals such as cows, giraffes and deer have stomachs with multiple compartments (not multiple stomachs as is commonly believed). While others like seahorses, lungfishes and platypuses have no stomachs at all.

Today we are going to discuss the “Risk” factors involve in Capsule endoscopy. The main risk of this technique is getting the camera stuck on a narrow area in the small bowel. Your doctor will often take special precautions to try to see if you have a stricture or narrow area in the small bowel before you use the PillCam. Even these precautions may not identify a subtle narrow area on x-ray studies. If the PillCam gets stuck and does not move, standard surgery may be required to relieve the obstruction and recover the PillCam.

Did you know?!? The approximate surface area of the small intestine is 2,700 feet; That’s over half the size of a basketball court!

January 05, 2016
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Probiotics are so-called "friendly bacteria" that also occur naturally in the gut and have been linked to all sorts of digestive health benefits, including helping irritable bowel syndrome and traveller's diarrhoea.

You can take probiotics as supplements (available from health food shops) or in live yoghurt, which is a good natural source. You'll need to take them every day for at least four weeks to see any beneficial effect.

January 05, 2016
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An enteroscopy helps doctors find and treat problems in the digestive system. A thin, flexible tube with a camera inside is used to see inside your body. This tube is called an endoscope. Enteroscopy is used to detect problems with your small intestine or stomach. Doctors may recommend enteroscopy if you have any of the following:

  • High immune cell count
  • Small bowel tumors
  • Blocked bowel passages
  • Intestinal damage from radiation
  • Abnormal bleeding
  • Chronic low iron
  • Unexplained severe diarrhea
  • Unexplained malnutrition

December 29, 2015
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Stomach rumblings, are the result of peristalsis in the stomach and small intestines — that is, they're due to normal digestion as food, fluid and gases pass through your gastrointestinal tract. When the tract is empty, however, borborygmi are louder because there's nothing in there to muffle the sound.

So why are the muscles contracting at all when there's no food in the stomach?

After the stomach empties its contents into the small intestine, it sends signals to the brain. The brain responds by telling the digestive muscles to commence the process of peristalsis. The muscle contractions ensure that no excess food was left in the stomach, and the resulting growls signal to you that your body needs food.

December 29, 2015
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For better digestive health incorporate probiotics into your diet. Probiotics are the healthy bacteria naturally present in your digestive tract. "They help keep the body healthy by combating the effects of a poor diet, antibiotics, and stress," says Adams. In addition, probiotics can enhance nutrient absorption, help break down lactose, strengthen your immune system, and possibly even help treat irritable bowel syndrome. Adams recommends that people eat good sources of probiotics, such as low-fat yogurt or kefir, on a daily basis.

December 29, 2015
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An upper endoscopy is a procedure used to visually examine your upper digestive system with a tiny camera on the end of a long, flexible tube. A specialist in diseases of the digestive system (gastroenterologist) uses endoscopy to diagnose and, sometimes, treat conditions that affect the esophagus, stomach and beginning of the small intestine (duodenum).

The medical term for an upper endoscopy is esophagogastroduodenoscopy. An upper endoscopy may be done in your doctor's office, an outpatient surgery center or a hospital.

December 17, 2015
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How much will it hurt during and after the RFA procedure?

You will be sedated during the procedure. The type of sedation will be based on your general medical condition. The vast majority of people do not report pain during the procedure. In clinical trials, most patients have reported no or minimal discomfort during the procedure.

Patients may experience chest discomfort, sore throat and/or painful or difficult swallowing after the procedure, which are managed with medications provided by the physician. In clinical trials, these symptoms typically resolved within 3-4 days. In a randomized control trial evaluating RFA in 127 patients, the average chest discomfort score (as reported by the patients) was 23 out of 100 on the first day after the procedure. By day eight, the average chest discomfort score was zero in these patients.

 

December 17, 2015
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Whole grains, such as whole-wheat bread, oats, and brown rice, are a good source of fiber, which helps digestion. Fiber also can help you feel full and lower cholesterol, but it can cause bloating, gas, and other problems in people who quickly ramp up their intake—it's better to take it slow when consuming more. And wheat grains are a no-no for those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.

December 17, 2015
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Did you know: The whole digestive tract is over 29 feet long, starting at the mouth and ending at the anus.

December 04, 2015
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If you’re feeling nauseated, the last thing you should have is an alcoholic drink. “It will probably make you sicker”. Nutritionally speaking, alcohol itself is a big zero. It has no protein, vitamins, other nutrients, or “good” carbs. Alcohol is toxic to the stomach lining and changes liver metabolism. Drinking too much can cause indigestion, among other health problems. Moderation is key.

 

PEG

December 04, 2015
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A PEG is a safe and effective way to provide food, liquids and medications (when appropriate) directly into the stomach. The procedure is done for patients who are having difficulty swallowing. During the procedure, a physician places an endoscope (a long, thin, flexible instrument about 1/2 inch in diameter) into your mouth. The endoscope is then advanced through your esophagus (the "food pipe" leading from your mouth into your stomach) and into your stomach. The endoscope is used to ensure correct positioning of the PEG tube (also called a feeding tube) in your stomach. The PEG tube rests in the stomach and exits through the skin of the abdomen.

December 04, 2015
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Digestion is important for breaking down food into nutrients, which the body uses for energy, growth, and cell repair. Food and drink must be changed into smaller molecules of nutrients before the blood absorbs them and carries them to cells throughout the body. The body breaks down nutrients from food and drink into carbohydrates, protein, fats, and vitamins.

  1. Carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the sugars, starches, and fiber found in many foods. Carbohydrates are called simple or complex, depending on their chemical structure. Simple carbohydrates include sugars found naturally in foods such as fruits, vegetables, milk, and milk products, as well as sugars added during food processing.
  2. Protein. Foods such as meat, eggs, and beans consist of large molecules of protein that the body digests into smaller molecules called amino acids. The body absorbs amino acids through the small intestine into the blood, which then carries them throughout the body.
  3. Fats. Fat molecules are a rich source of energy for the body and help the body absorb vitamins. Oils, such as corn, canola, olive, safflower, soybean, and sunflower, are examples of healthy fats. Butter, shortening, and snack foods are examples of less healthy fats.
  4. Vitamins. Scientists classify vitamins by the fluid in which they dissolve. Water-soluble vitamins include all the B vitamins and vitamin C. Fat-soluble vitamins include vitamins A, D, E, and K. Each vitamin, has a different role in the body’s growth and health. 

 

November 23, 2015
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Did you know?! Muscles contract and relax in the esophagus to push food down to the stomach — it works even when you’re upside down!

Bright red blood in the toilet bowl when you move your bowels could be a sign of hemorrhoids, which is a very common condition. In fact, 75 percent of Americans over the age of 45 have hemorrhoids, according to the NIDDK.

Treat this common digestive condition by eating more fiber, drinking more water, and exercising. Over-the-counter creams and suppositories may provide temporary relief of symptoms. Visit Lee Eugene MD for regular check up. Sometimes hemorrhoids need to be removed surgically.

As with any procedure, there are risks associated with a colonoscopy. Before obtaining your consent for the procedure, the doctor will tell the patient about the potential risks.

  • The most common side effects are cramping pain and abdominal swelling caused by the air used to inflate the colon during the procedure.
  • If a biopsy is performed during the procedure, the patient may see small amounts of blood in the bowel movements after the examination. This may last a few days.
  • Though rare, there is potential for the colonoscope to injure the intestinal wall, causing perforation, infection, or bleeding.
  • Although this test is very helpful in finding the cause of many digestive diseases, abnormalities can go undetected.
  • When this test is performed, the patient will be given sedating medications to make the test more comfortable. Whenever a medication is given, a risk of an allergic reaction or side effect of the medication itself is present. 
November 10, 2015
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Did you know?!? Saliva in our mouths plays a key role in initial digestion by moistening the food to help with the mechanical chewing and swallowing process. Saliva also contains an enzyme which starts the chemical digestion of starchy foods.

Did you know?!? Lactose intolerance is the inability to break down a type of natural sugar called lactose. Lactose is commonly found in dairy products, such as milk and yogurt. A person becomes lactose intolerant when his or her small intestine stops making enough of the enzyme lactase to digest and break down the lactose. When this happens, the undigested lactose moves into the large intestine. The bacteria that are normally present in the large intestine interact with the undigested lactose and cause symptoms such as bloating, gas, and diarrhea.

November 10, 2015
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Gastritis is inflammation of the protective lining of the stomach. Acute gastritis involves sudden, severe inflammation, while chronic gastritis involves long-term inflammation that can last for years if it’s left untreated. So the next question is what causes gastritis?

Weakness in your stomach lining allows digestive juices to damage and inflame it, causing gastritis. Having a thin or damaged stomach lining raises your risk for gastritis. Also, certain conditions and activities increase your risk for developing gastritis.

A gastrointestinal bacterial infection can cause gastritis. The most common is infection with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that infects the lining of the stomach. It’s usually passed from person-to-person, but it can also be transmitted through contaminated food or water.

13 Resources for Colon Cancer Financial Assistance

Colon cancer can be a burden, not only physically or emotionally, but financially as well. But you're not alone.

We've compiled a list of places that can help with colon cancer financial assistance, with the help of Colon Cancer Alliance and Chris 4 Life.

WHO report says processed meats raise colon cancer risk 

World Health Organization panel says there is sufficient scientific evidence to conclude that processed meats such as ham and bacon can increase the risk of colon cancer. The report also said scientific data indicate eating red meat, including pork and lamb, probably increases the risk as well. Dr. John Ioannidis of Stanford University said the risk from eating red meat is small, and it would be "an exaggeration" to say people should not eat any processed or red meat. The New York Times (free-article access for SmartBrief readers) 

October 08, 2015
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If you’re constipated, avoid processed foods because they lack fiber, which helps regulate bowel movements. Processed foods also often contain preservatives and artificial coloring and people with allergies or sensitivities to these additives will feel their effects during digestive problems. Note that some packaged foods contain lactose, which can give you gas and worsen any discomfort you’re already going through.

October 08, 2015
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Gastroparesis, which means partial paralysis of the stomach, is a serious disease that prevents your stomach from digesting food and emptying properly. Damaged nerves and muscles don’t function with their normal strength and coordination. That slows the movement of contents through your digestive system.

The primary cause of gastroparesis is damage to or dysfunction of peripheral nerves and muscles.

In diabetic patients, it appears as more of a neuropathy-based disease associated with damaged nerves. In patients who don’t have diabetes, it seems more muscular-based: The nerve endings are all right, but the muscles are not responding.

In addition to diabetes, other sources of gastroparesis include:

  • Lingering post-viral effects — You get a virus, but the nausea and vomiting from the virus don’t go away after the virus is gone.“Some of those cases will resolve, and we just have to wait and watch”. “But a lot of times it doesn’t resolve, so we have to continue to treat the patients.”
  • Connective tissue diseases — Gastroparesis may plague patients who have diseases such as multiple sclerosis or muscular dystrophy.
  • Side effects from medication — Probably the most difficult group to treat, narcotic pain medicines and other drugs slow a patient’s intestinal motility.“That can be very hard to treat, because the medications often override what we prescribe to treat the gastroparesis,” he says.
  • Post-surgical effects — Some patients develop gastroparesis after the vagus nerve is damaged or trapped during a gastrointestinal surgical procedure.

October 08, 2015
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The capsule is equipped with a miniature video camera and light source It travels painlessly through your entire digestive tract. It captures images quickly and sends them to a recording device you wear during the procedure.

And, unless your doctor tells you otherwise, you can move around freely throughout the examination. PillCam SB is disposable and passes naturally through your body. It really is that simple.

October 02, 2015
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California website shows quality, price for health care services The California Department of Insurance launched a website that allows state residents to compare the quality and price of health care services. The site offers quality information about services for childbirth, hip and knee replacement, colon cancer screening, diabetes and back pain, and cost information by county for 100 procedures.
Kaiser Health News

Read the full article here

September 16, 2015
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How HALO Radiofrequency Ablation is performed?

While a patient is under conscious sedation, a gastroenterologist will insert an endoscope, or a small flexible tube, into the patient’s mouth. Depending on the extent of diseased tissue, the physician will choose one of two ablation catheters to attach to the end of the endoscope: a balloon-mounted catheter (HALO360) or an endoscope-mounted catheter (HALO90). 

The HALO360 catheter has a balloon at its tip that is covered by a band of radiofrequency electrodes and is used to treat larger areas of Barrett’s tissue. The gastroenterologist guides the endoscope so the electrode-covered balloon is on the treatment area, inflates the balloon and delivers a very short burst of controlled radiofrequency energy--for less than one second--to remove Barrett’s tissue. For smaller areas, the doctor will position the HALO90 catheter and its electrode on the diseased area of the esophagus to deliver the energy.

September 16, 2015
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Researchers describe using endoscopy to remove an upper gastrointestinal obstruction caused by deliberate ingestion of illicit drug packets in the July issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Timothy Cowan et al report the case of a 30 year old man in police custody after ingesting a plastic bag containing methamphetamine. The patient complained of esophageal pain and was unable to swallow fluids, including his own saliva.

Computed tomography (CT) showed the bag lodged in his mid-esophagus (arrow, left side of figure).

The physicians performed endoscopy under general anesthesia 5 hrs after the patient ingested the bag, and confirmed complete esophageal obstruction (right side of figure).

The undamaged plastic bag was entirely removed using forceps and a Roth Net retriever.

The patient did not develop significant methamphetamine toxicity and was discharged from the hospital 24 hours after the procedure.
Cowan et al state that esophageal obstruction appears to be a rare complication of body stuffing (swallowing drugs in an unplanned attempt to escape police discovery)  or packing (swallowing large amounts of well-packaged drugs to transport them internationally).
The authors propose a role for endoscopy in treating cases of upper gastrointestinal obstruction caused by swallowed drug packets.

Courtesy: AGA Journals

 

September 16, 2015
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Did you know? When you eat something, the food doesn't simply fall through your esophagus and into your stomach. The muscles in your esophagus constrict and relax in a wavelike manner called peristalsis, pushing the food down through the small canal and into the stomach.

Because of peristalsis, even if you were to eat while hanging upside down, the food would still be able to get to your stomach.

 

An empty stomach allows for the best and safest examination, so you should have nothing to eat or drink, including water, for approximately 12 hours before the examination. Your doctor will tell you when to start fasting.

Speak with your doctor in advance about any medications or supplements you take, including iron, aspirin, bismuth subsalicylate products and other “over-the-counter” medications. You might need to adjust your usual dose prior to the examination.

September 04, 2015
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The artificial sweetener perhaps most associated with digestive problems is sorbitol. It is a hard-to-digest sugar found naturally in some fruits, including prunes, apples, and peaches, and is also used to sweeten gum and diet foods. Once sorbitol reaches the large intestine, it often creates gas, bloating, and diarrhea. If you have diarrhea, read food labels so that you can avoid sorbitol.

Cells along the inner wall of the stomach secrete roughly 2 liters (0.5 gallons) of hydrochloric acid each day, which helps kill bacteria and aids in digestion. If hydrochloric acid sounds familiar to you, it may be because the powerful chemical is commonly used to remove rust and scale from steel sheets and coils, and is also found in some cleaning supplies, including toilet-bowl cleaners.

To protect itself from the corrosive acid, the stomach lining has a thick coating of mucus. But this mucus can't buffer the digestive juices indefinitely, so the stomach produces a new coat of mucus every two weeks.

 

August 24, 2015
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Fatty foods stimulate contractions in the digestive tract, which, surprisingly, can either slow down the emptying of the stomach and worsen constipation or speed up movement and worsen or lead to diarrhea. The effect can depend on the type of fat and your tendency toward constipation or diarrhea. When you’re experiencing a bout of indigestion, put low-fat foods on the menu and eat small meals spaced throughout the day, which can put less pressure on your stomach. Avoid high-fat culprits, like butter, ice cream, red meat, and cheese, at least for a while.

 

August 24, 2015
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Did you know: Hydrochloric acid, produced by the stomach, can dissolve metal but has no effect on plastic. 

Patients will be kept in an observation area for an hour or two post-colonoscopy until the effects of medications that have been given adequately wear off. If patients have been given sedatives before or during colonoscopy, they may not drive, even if they feel alert. Someone else must drive them home. The patient's reflexes and judgment may be impaired for the rest of the day, making it unsafe to drive, operate machinery, or make important decisions. Should patients have some cramping or bloating, this can be relieved quickly with the passage of gas, and they should be able to eat upon returning home. After the removal of polyps or certain other manipulations, the diet or activities of patients may be restricted for a brief period of time.

Did you know: Within the colon, a typical person harbors more than 400 distinct species of bacteria. 

By Eugene Lee
August 07, 2015
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What you eat can contribute to digestive problems. Many people eat too much processed food and sugar, and not enough fiber, fruits, and vegetables. Poor eating habits, such as eating too quickly or skipping meals, can also be part of the problem. Many digestive problems can be prevented by eating a healthy, balanced diet. The following are lists of healthy foods that may be incorporated into your diet.                    

Endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography, or ERCP, is a specialized technique used to study the bile ducts, pancreatic duct and gallbladder. Ducts are drainage routes; the drainage channels from the liver are called bile or biliary ducts. The pancreatic duct is the drainage channel from the pancreas.
During ERCP, your doctor will pass an endoscope through your mouth, esophagus and stomach into the duodenum (first part of the small intestine). An endoscope is a thin, flexible tube that lets your doctor see inside your bowels. After your doctor sees the common opening to the ducts from the liver and pancreas, called the major duodenal papilla, your doctor will pass a narrow plastic tube called a catheter through the endoscope and into the ducts. Your doctor will inject a contrast material (dye) into the pancreatic or biliary ducts and will take X-rays.

                                     

Study data showed using antibiotics to eliminate Helicobacter pylori bacteria may reduce the risk of gastric cancer in healthy individuals. The studies did not show any differences in the risk of death from all causes. Medscape (free registration)

An expert panel of infectious disease specialists conducted a literature review of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea prevention measures and risk factors and voted to approve 11 recommendations, published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.

July 23, 2015
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Intestinal failure occurs when your intestines can't digest food and absorb the fluids, electrolytes and nutrients essential to live.

Intestinal failure is most often caused by short bowel syndrome, a problem that affects people who have had half or more of their small intestine removed due to injury or surgery to treat conditions such as trauma or mesenteric artery thrombosis. Intestinal failure also may be caused by digestive disorders, such as Crohn's disease or chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome, which causes the bowel to malfunction.

 

July 23, 2015
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In some cases, you may be referred for a gastroscopy to look inside your stomach directly and see whether you have a stomach ulcer.

The procedure involves passing a thin, flexible tube (an endoscope) with a camera at one end into your mouth and down into your stomach and first section of the small intestine (duodenum). You may be given a mild sedative injection before the procedure and have your throat sprayed with a local anaesthetic to make it more comfortable to pass the endoscope.

The images taken by the camera will usually confirm or rule out an ulcer. A small tissue sample may also be taken from your stomach or duodenum, so it can be tested for the H. pylori bacteria. A gastroscopy is usually carried out as an outpatient procedure, which means you won't have to spend the night in clinic.

 

July 13, 2015
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Did you know? The liver is the largest organ in the body and performs more than 500 functions.

July 13, 2015
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Your sweet tooth may affect more than just your waistline. The caffeine contained in chocolate may trigger heartburn and IBS symptoms in people prone to digestive disorders. What’s more, like coffee, chocolate is also a diuretic, which can result in loose stool or diarrhea.

 

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors affecting the gastrointestinal tract; however, they account for 0.1 to 3% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. GISTs originate from peacemaker cells known as interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) that are found in the gastrointestinal tract, whose function is to control gut motility. GISTs express the transmembrane receptor c-kit (CD117), which has a tyrosine kinase activity and is codified by c-kit protooncogene. In general, the ligand for c-kit receptor is the stem cell factor (scf). Gastrointestinal stromal tumors can occur anywhere along the length of the digestive tract, however, the most frequent sites for these types of tumors to arise are: the stomach (70%), the small intestine (20%) and the esophagus, the colon and the rectum (10%). Sometimes they also occur in the omentum, the mesentery or the peritoneal cavity. The people with a higher incidence to suffer from GISTs are those who are between 50 and 70 years old, its prevalence being equal both in men and women.

Did you know? The whole digestive tract is over 29 feet long, starting at the mouth and ending at the anus.

 
July 01, 2015
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Drinks with caffeine, such as coffee, colas, tea and some fizzy drinks, boost acid in the stomach leading to heartburn in some people. Fizzy drinks in general tend to bloat the tummy, which can also lead to heartburn.

To make digestive problems less likely, choose drinks that aren’t fizzy and don’t contain caffeine, such as herbal teas, milk and plain water. If you can’t do without your coffee or builder’s tea, limit your intake to one or two cups a day.

Before a flexible sigmoidoscopy exam, you'll need to clean out your colon. Any residue in your colon may obscure the view of your colon and rectum during the exam. To empty your colon, follow your doctor's instructions carefully. You may be asked to:

  1. Follow a special diet the day before the exam. Typically, you won't be able to eat the day before the exam. Drinks may be limited to clear liquids — plain water, broth, carbonated beverages, and tea and coffee without milk or cream. You may not be able to eat or drink anything after midnight the night before the exam.
  2. Take a laxative the night before the exam. The laxative will be in either pill or liquid form.
  3. Use an enema kit. In some cases, you may need to use an over-the-counter enema kit — either the night before the exam or a few hours before the exam — to empty your colon. Or you may be asked to take two enemas at home the morning of the procedure.
  4. Adjust your medications. Remind your doctor of your medications at least a week before the exam — especially if you have diabetes, if you take medications or supplements that contain iron, or if you take aspirin or other blood thinners. You may need to adjust your dosages or stop taking the medication temporarily.

Colorectal cancer risks are lower with high-quality colonoscopies, study says. Higher-quality colonoscopies, as determined by adenoma detection rates, may reduce the risk of colon cancer and colon cancer mortality by 50% to 60%, based on a study on nearly 57,600 patients in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California health care system published in JAMA.  Healio (free registration) (6/16)HealthDay News(6/16) | Read the full article here.  

June 15, 2015
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Upper endoscopy usually is performed to evaluate possible problems with the esophagus, stomach or duodenum, and evaluate symptoms such as upper abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, difficulty in swallowing, or intestinal bleeding anemia. Upper endoscopy is more accurate than X-ray for detecting inflammation or smaller abnormalities such as ulcers or tumors within the reach of the instrument. Its other major advantage over X-ray is the ability to perform biopsies (obtain small pieces of tissue) or cytology (obtain some cells with a fine brush) for microscopic examination to determine the nature of the abnormality and whether any abnormality is benign or malignant (cancerous). 

June 15, 2015
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One of the most touted health benefits of Greek yogurt is the probiotics it contains. These healthy bacteria help promote a healthy gut. Your digestive tract naturally contains lots of different types of bacteria – some good, helping you digest food, and some potentially harmful. Eating Greek yogurt with probiotics helps increase the good bacteria in your gut. And the more good bacteria you take in, the less room there is for the bad varieties to grow. Maintaining this healthy balance of friendly bacteria can help with several digestive issues.

June 15, 2015
Category: Gastrointestinal
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Peptic ulcers are painful sores on the lining of the esophagus, stomach or small intestine, and they affect approximately 50 million Americans each year, according to a 2007 study in the journal American Family Physician.

Physicians long thought that stress and spicy food caused people to develop the sores — an explanation that seemed to make sense, given that ulcer patients often complain about burning pain after eating spicy food. So for almost 100 years, doctors prescribed a treatment involving rest and a bland diet.

In 1982, Australian researchers Barry Marshall and Robin Warren discovered that the real culprit behind ulcers is the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which burrows into the stomach's mucosal lining. Thanks to this finding, doctors have come up with a better treatment for ulcers: antibiotics.

June 01, 2015
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Cells along the inner wall of the stomach secrete roughly 2 liters (0.5 gallons) of hydrochloric acid each day, which helps kill bacteria and aids in digestion. If hydrochloric acid sounds familiar to you, it may be because the powerful chemical is commonly used to remove rust and scale from steel sheets and coils, and is also found in some cleaning supplies, including toilet-bowl cleaners.

To protect itself from the corrosive acid, the stomach lining has a thick coating of mucus. But this mucus can't buffer the digestive juices indefinitely, so the stomach produces a new coat of mucus every two weeks.

 

May 19, 2015
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Heartburn is caused by stomach acid backing up into your esophagus. About one third of the U.S. population experiences frequent burning sensations, regurgitation, belching, and a sour taste in the mouth… When diets are shifted to healthier choices and proper food combinations, the heartburn often dissipates, a message that perhaps the trouble is not too much stomach acid but repeatedly choosing the wrong foods in the wrong combinations… Blocking your stomach acids with antacids has negative side effects that advertisers don’t share with you. A gut with suppressed stomach acid becomes vulnerable to harmful microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, parasites). One of the jobs of stomach acid is to kill these unwanted predators… Sufficient stomach acid would normally have killed off these microbes, but [instead] they have an opportunity to enter your gut and cause havoc.

May 19, 2015
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Banana is perfect for the proper functioning of the bowel moment. It is a must-have food if you are suffering with diarrhea, because it helps to restore the amount of electrolytes and potassium that are lost during the passage of stools," says Priya. Besides, it is also loaded with fiber which aids in good digestion.

The Bravo system includes a capsule measuring 6 mm by 5.5 mm by 25 mm and containing a 3.5 mm deep well connected to an external vacuum unit. The physician inserts the capsule orally or transnasally into the esophagus during upper endoscopy. Using the vacuum unit, the physician pulls esophageal tissue into the well and literally pins the capsule into place. The delivery system is withdrawn, and the capsule is left in place to record pH data. Placement of the capsule takes about 10 minutes, and patient discomfort is minimal. Attachment of the capsule creates less trauma to the esophagus than a standard biopsy, and the point of attachment heals within several days.

Once the capsule is in place in the esophagus, it begins transmitting data via radio frequency telemetry to the Bravo receiver, which the patient wears on his or her belt. Once the test is complete, data are uploaded from the receiver to a computer for analysis and evaluation by a nurse or physician.    

May 18, 2015
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Polyps are abnormal growths of tissue that form on the lining of the colon. Polyps are almost always benign. While many benign polyps are harmless, others are considered “precancerous.” Precancerous polyps carry the potential to turn into cancer. They are generally slow growing, so a small precancerous polyp may take 10-15 years to turn into cancer. Approximately 30 percent of people over the age of 50 have precancerous polyps. Colonoscopy permits the early detection and removal of polyps. Because almost all colorectal cancers start as small polyps, the removal of these polyps at the time of colonoscopy is an effective means to prevent colorectal cancer. The removal of polyps (polypectomy) is a painless procedure.

May 18, 2015
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The intestinal ecosystem constitutes the microbiota that can be pictured as a microbial organ placed within a host organism and involves a dynamic interplay between food, host cells and microbes. This infographic is a great source to know about the intestinal health system.

May 18, 2015
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Our digestive systems continuously extract water and nutrients from an astonishing amount of solid foods and liquids over our lifetimes, all the while fending off nasty microbes and processing waste. What we put into our stomachs is so important that it affects whether we feel well, how flat our bellies are and even our chances of avoiding certain cancers.

1. Eat to beat disease: citrus fruit, fiber-rich foods, leafy greens and yellow vegetables
2. Help the good bugs: yogurt, sauerkraut, miso, bananas, garlic, asparagus, onions
3. Choose foods that soothe: caraway, cardamom, cinnamon, cumin, fennel, ginger, mint, nutmeg, oatmeal
4. Eat foods to flatten your tummy: avocado, brown rice, dark chocolate, nuts, oatmeal, olive oil, seeds

April 24, 2015
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An endoscope is a long thin tool with a light and camera. It will be inserted through your mouth, down your throat, and into your stomach. The camera will send images to a video monitor. The images will be used to find the right spot to insert the PEG feeding tube.

A needle will be inserted through the abdominal wall and into the stomach at the chosen spot. Using the endoscope, the doctor will locate the end of the needle inside the body. A thin wire will be passed from the outside of the body, through this needle, and into the stomach. This wire will be grasped with a snare in the abdomen and pulled out through the mouth. There will be a thin wire entering the front of the abdomen, going into the stomach, and continuing up and out of the mouth. The PEG feeding tube will then be attached to this wire. The wire will be pulled back out from the abdomen. This will pull the PEG tube down into the body.

A small incision will be made in your abdomen. The tube will be pulled until the tip comes out of the incision in the abdominal wall. A soft, round bumper will be attached to the ends of the PEG tube. It will keep the tube secure. Sterile gauze will be placed around the incision site. The PEG tube will be taped to your abdomen.

 

 

Did you know?!? An adult esophagus ranges from 10 to 14 inches in length, and 1 inch in diameter.

 

Did you know: Cancer of the oesophagus can be prevented, when you start consuming a bowl of strawberries. Esophageal cancer is the third most common gastrointestinal cancer, and the sixth most frequent cause of cancer death in the world. About 16,000 new cases of esophageal cancer a year are diagnosed in the U.S., according to the American Cancer Society.

By mygidoctors.com
April 16, 2015
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If you’re experiencing nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, you’ll want to avoid food choices that stimulate the digestive system, and these include spicy foods.  Spicy foods are “incredibly variable,” they have no effect on some people, but cause indigestion for others. In general, you should choose bland foods when you’re having digestive problems, and be sure to avoid spices if you’re sensitive to them.

By mygidoctors.com
April 16, 2015
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Did you know?!? Within the colon, a typical person harbors more than 400 distinct species of bacteria.

 

By mygidoctors.com
April 16, 2015
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Preparing for a colonoscopy may be uncomfortable and time-consuming, but it needn’t be an ordeal. Here are some things you can do to help it go as smoothly and comfortably as possible:

Make sure you receive your colonoscopy prep instructions well before your procedure date, and read them completely as soon as you get them. This is the time to call your clinician with any questions and to buy the bowel prep she or he has prescribed. Pick up some medicated wipes (for example, Tucks or adult wet wipes with aloe and vitamin E) and a skin-soothing product such as Vaseline or Desitin — you’re going to be experiencing high-volume, high-velocity diarrhea.

Arrange for the time and privacy you need to complete the prep with as little stress as possible. Clear your schedule, and be at home on time to start your prep. If you have children or aging parents who need attention, have someone else be available to them while you’re indisposed.

Water can get boring, so keep a variety of clear liquids on hand. On the day before your colonoscopy — when you’re restricted to clear liquids — you can have popsicles, Jell-O, clear broth, coffee or tea (without milk or creamer), soft drinks, Italian ice, or Gatorade. But take nothing with red, blue, or purple dye. Drink extra liquids before, during, and after your bowel prep (usually until a few hours before your procedure), as well as after your colonoscopy.

Benefits

Oatmeal is an underutilized, heart-healthy whole grain
Oatmeal is an inexpensive but underutilized heart-healthy whole grain that
is high in fiber. Its slow-digesting carbohydrates provide energy. Soluble
fiber in oatmeal helps people feel fuller longer, which reduces hunger and
can help with weight loss. MedicalDaily.com

April 16, 2015
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Heartburn is caused by stomach acid backing up into your esophagus. About one third of the U.S. population experiences frequent burning sensations, regurgitation, belching and a sour taste in the mouth. When diets are shifted to healthier choices and proper food combinations, the heartburn often dissipates, a message that perhaps the trouble is not too much stomach acid but repeatedly choosing the wrong foods in the wrong combinations. Blocking your stomach acids with antacids has negative side effects that advertisers don't share with you. A gut with suppressed stomach acid becomes vulnerable to harmful microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, parasites) One of the jobs of stomach acid is to kill these unwanted predators. Sufficient stomach acid would normally have killed off these microbes, but instead, they have an opportunity to enter your gut and cause havoc.

Another job of stomach acid is to help break down certain nutrients for easy absoprtion, especially iron and calcium. Overusing antacids may set you up for osteoporosis or anemia. I know that the advertisements say that your antacid has calcium in it, but calcium needs stomach acid to be absorbed properly.

Stomach acid helps digest protein. When your digestion is compromised, conditions such as gas, bloating, food allergies and dysbiosis (poor intestinal bacteria balance) can develop from insufficiently digested proteins.

By mygidoctors
April 06, 2015
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Fatty foods, such as chips, burgers and fried foods, are harder to digest and can cause stomach pain and heartburn. Cutting back on greasy, fried foods eases your stomach’s workload. Try to eat more lean meat and fish, drink skimmed or semi-skimmed milk and grill rather than fry foods.

By mygidoctors
April 06, 2015
Category: Endoscopy
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Every time our patient ask how should they prepare for the Capsule Endoscopy procedure? So here is what you need to do before the procedure.

The day prior to your appointment you will be given a bowel prep that will eliminate waste from your entire colon to allow the capsule to take clear pictures of the small bowel wall. You will also be asked not to eat solid foods and follow a clear liquid diet the day prior and day of your procedure until you are instructed otherwise.

Tell your doctor of the presence of a pacemaker, previous abdominal surgery, or previous history of obstructions in the bowel, inflammatory bowel disease, or adhesions.

By mygidoctors
April 06, 2015
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If your parent, child, or sibling had colon cancer, your risk is nearly doubled. Visit www.mygidoctors.com

By mygidoctors
March 27, 2015
Category: Gastrointestinal
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Some viral and allergic gastrointestinal disorders injure the lining of the intestines, especially the cells that produce lactose. This results in temporary lactose malabsorption problems. This is why children often cannot tolerate milk for a month or two after an intestinal infection. Yogurt, however, because it contains less lactose and more lactose, is usually well-tolerated by healing intestines and is a popular “healing food” for diarrhea. Many pediatricians recommend yogurt for children suffering from various forms of indigestion. Research shows that children recover faster from diarrhea when eating yogurt. It’s good to eat yogurt while taking antibiotics. The yogurt will minimize the effects of the antibiotic on the friendly bacteria in the intestines.

By mygidoctors
March 27, 2015
Category: Disgestive Health
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Did you know: The large intestine includes the cecum, appendix, colon, and rectum. It is the final part of the digestive system. It absorbs water from the remaining indigestible food matter, and passes any un-needed waste from the body.

 
By mygidoctors
March 26, 2015
Category: Disgestive Health
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Keeping the digestive system operating in peak condition is important for your overall #health, but can sometimes be difficult to maintain with the busy #lifestyles that we lead today.


Here are a few tips to help keep your digestive system in peak condition.

1) Balanced Nutrition. It goes without saying that a balanced, natural diet is in tune with our body’s inner workings – after all, our caveman ancestors certainly did not dine on a diet of burgers and fries. It should be your goal to eat unprocessed food, in a format as close to it’s natural state as possible.

2) Drink Plenty Of Water. Most of us do not drink nearly as much water as our body needs. The Institute of Medicine recommends that women drink 9 cups of water a day, and men drink 13 cups.

3) Eat Smaller, and More Frequent Meals. Nutritionists recommend a smaller intake of food consumed throughout the day as 4-5 meals, rather than the traditional 3 meals in a day.

4) Chew Food Thoroughly, East Slowly. This is difficult to do when you’re on the move, but slowing down the way you eat helps digestion enormously. It gives the enzymes in your saliva a better chance of breaking down carbohydrates.

5) Take Care Of Your Body. Physical care of your body can have a profound affect on your digestion. Exercise regularly (at least 30 minutes a day) to help maintain a healthy heart and blood flow. 

Increasing colorectal cancer screening rates to 80% by 2018 may result in 21,000 fewer deaths per year by 2030. The study follows the launch of an initiative by the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable coalition to reach the screening goal.  HealthDay News

By mygidoctors
March 18, 2015
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Citrus fruits and sauces, such as lemons, limes, oranges, tomoto sauce and grapefruits, are acidic and can cause digestive problems. Many people don’t realize that carbonated beverages are also acidic — Krevsky says that if you leave a pearl in a glass of soda pop overnight, it will dissolve. When you have an upset stomach, avoid acidic foods.

By mygidoctors
March 18, 2015
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Endoscopy  

An endoscope is an instrument used to examine organs and cavities inside the body. The German physician Philipp Bozzini developed a primitive version of the endoscope, called the lichtleiter (meaning "light conductor"), in the early 1800s to inspect a number of bodily areas, including the ear, nasal cavity and urethra.

Colonoscopy is the preferred colorectal cancer screening test because it
finds and removes polyps, and thereby prevents future colon cancers. Recent
data show that both the number of new cases of colon cancer (incidence) and
deaths from the disease are decreased when colonoscopy is performed. For
normal risk individuals, the American College of Gastroenterology recommends
colonoscopy beginning at age 50, and age 45 for African-Americans.

http://patients.gi.org/topics/colorectal-cancer/#

Wear blue on March 6th to spread the word about National Dress in Blue Day and colon cancer. This is a cancer we can beat by catching it early during routine screening. Help me spread this lifesaving message! Learn more about how to get involved at
www.dressinblueday.org. #DressinBlueDay

February 04, 2015
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Colon cancer deaths are down 47%, per new report.

U.S. cancer death rates dropped 22% from 1991 to 2011, amounting to approximately 1.5 million lives saved, according to a new report from the American Cancer Society. Colon cancer death rates dropped almost 50%, researchers said. Despite the improvement, colon cancer will still be a top cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. in the next few years.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/more-than-1-million-cancer-deaths-averted-in-last-two-decades/

Study finds cancer risk for IBD patients but no link to drugs for treatment Almost 30% of inflammatory bowel disease patients who have had cancer face a risk of a secondary or recurrent cancer, researchers reported at the 2014 Advances in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases conference. Dr. Jordan Axelrad said treatment with immunosuppressive drugs was not linked to a secondary cancer. 

http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/gooGCvkeswmvyiaIfCwjiMcNXgFD?format=standard

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists
December 01, 2014
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Colorectal cancer rates are decreasing among older adults due to screening, but rising among those younger than age 50. Weill Cornell Medical College research showed young-onset colorectal cancer was more likely in men and in blacks and Hispanics than in women and whites, and tended to present at more advanced stages when compared with old-onset cancer. Healio (free registration)/Gastroenterology

http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/gjejCvkeswmjiyswfCwjiMcNgjCy?format=standard

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists
December 01, 2014
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A Minneapolis VA Medical Center study that looked at more than 76,000 screening colonoscopy records linked shorter withdrawal times to a higher risk of interval colorectal cancer. Data also showed longer withdrawal times may boost adenoma detection rates.

http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/giefCvkeswmgwPpIfCwjiMcOgxOv?format=standard

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists
December 01, 2014
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A National Cancer Institute study found drinking three or more cups of decaffeinated coffee each day may have an effect on enzymes that leads to better liver health. The study adds to earlier research showing caffeinated coffee may also protect the liver, suggesting caffeine may not be the key factor.

http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/gglWCvkeswmcvdlMfCwjiMcNNdxi?format=standard

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists
October 21, 2014
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A study from the German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke researched data from 347,237 people and estimated that up to 22% of colorectal cancer cases in men and 11% in women may have been prevented if people had followed all of the healthy behaviors. These include lifestyle factors like low abdominal fat, healthy weight, regular physical exercise, no smoking, limited intake of alcohol and diet rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, yogurt, nuts and seeds and foods rich in fiber, and low amount of red and processed meat. Read more:

http://www.scienceworldreport.com/articles/17893/20141010/adopting-several-healthy-behavior-cuts-the-risk-of-bowel-cancer.htm#ixzz3GE7MvL7y

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Consultants
September 09, 2014
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A systematic review of studies showed drinkers had a 17% increased risk for precancerous colorectal polyps, compared with nondrinkers or occasional alcohol drinkers.  The risk was higher for those drinking more. http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/829964?nlid=64164_461&src=wnl_edit_medp_gast&uac=177015MN&spon=20

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists
August 14, 2014
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Kaiser Permanente researchers reported that more Clostridium difficile infections are being acquired in community settings than in hospitals. The study of patients admitted to 14 Kaiser Permanente hospitals in Southern California between 2011 and 2012 showed 49% of cases were linked to community settings or undetermined sources, and 31% were tied to previous hospital stays. http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/829075

Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital found low vitamin D levels were associated with an increased risk for metastatic and nonmetastatic cancers, especially for colorectal cancer, in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Over a follow up period of 11 years, 7% of patients developed cancer. The study showed that vitamin D may offer long-term health benefits for IBD patients. MedPage Today (free registration) 

Click here to read more

Half with hepatitis C in U.S. are unaware of their infection Approximately 3.5 million people are estimated to have chronic hepatitis C in the U.S. Only half are aware of their condition, according to a study at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. And just 16% received treatment for HCV. Healio (free registration)/HCV.

Click here to read more...

In this Gallup Inc. study of all 50 states, they found Mississippi the fattest, with 35.4 percent of its people obese.  Montana was the slimmest state, with a 19.6 percent obesity rate. California had 23.6 percent of its people considered obese.  Chronic diseases including cancer were more prevalent in the states that were most obese.  http://www.gallup.com/poll/167642/mississippians-obese-montanans-least-obese.aspx

Screening prevented an estimated 550,000 cancer cases.
A report from the Yale Cancer Center has estimated that colorectal cancer screening prevented 550,000 cancer cases in the U.S. between 1976 and 2009.MedicalDaily.com

Each 1% increase in a physician's rate of adenoma detection during colonoscopy may reduce the patient's risk of cancer by 3% over the next decade, according to a study that included over 224,000 California patients. The results likely are due to the fact that precancerous polyps are removed during the procedure.  

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1309086

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists
April 03, 2014
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Dozens of groups dedicated to eliminating colorectal cancer as a major public health problem join together in Washington, DC on March 17th to hear new data related to progress in reducing deaths from colorectal cancer and to launch an effort to increase the nation’s colorectal cancer screening rate to 80 percent by the year 2018. ACG is joining with other members of the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable to focus efforts over the next four years on dramatically increasing the U.S. colorectal cancer screening rates and increasing awareness of the potential for early detection and prevention of this cancer.

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists
March 21, 2014
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Terry Harmon, of Grand Forks, N.D., was reluctant to have a colonoscopy at age 50, as he wasn't experiencing any symptoms of cancer, but added he now tells people to get screened.  Colonoscopy caught his colorectal cancer in time for a successful surgery to remove it.  "One day of your life could save
your life," he said.

Jamestown Sun (N.D.)

Colonscopy credited with lowering colon cancer rates:
American Cancer Society reported a 30% decrease in colon cancer cases over the past decade among adults over the age of 50 and credited screening colonoscopies for much of the improvement.

http://pressroom.cancer.org/CRCStats2014

 

 

 

March 07, 2014
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This month the Blue Star, introduced by the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable, turns 10. The Blue Star represents the eternal memory of the people whose lives have been lost to the disease and the shining hope for a future free of colorectal cancer. Learn more:

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. We have new fact sheets, infographics and resources to help you promote the importance of getting screened. Check them out here: http://goo.gl/iZedjI

By Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists
August 22, 2013
Category: Disgestive Health
Tags: Welcome  

Welcome to the Blog of Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists

Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists would like to welcome you to our blog. Here you will find informative and useful postings about gastroenterology and our practice.

At Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists we believe that educated patients are better prepared to make decisions regarding the health of their digestive system.  Our blog was designed to provide you with the latest gastroenterology developments and valuable health advice from our dedicated team. 

Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists hopes you find our blog to be a great resource for keeping up to date with proper digestive health care and treatments.

We welcome all comments and questions.

-- Peninsula Gastrointestinal Specialists





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